New EPA Stove Regulations Begin Cleaner Chapter for Wood Heating

Statement by the Alliance for Green Heat on the Wood Heater NSPS

Key EPA architects of this NSPS include
Greg Green, left, and Gil Wood,  right  and
Amanda Simcox. Gil retired on February 3. 
Overall, the EPA did a good job and released a fair rule that includes many compromises between industry and air quality agencies.  We think these rules are good for consumers and will not drive prices up substantially for most product categories, but will result in cleaner and more efficient appliances that will ultimately save consumers time and money. This is our initial reaction to the rule, which we will be followed by a more thorough analysis.

High performance stoves: The EPA took some key steps to address the lack of recognition for high performing appliances. Notably, stoves that test with cordwood in the next 5 years can use a special EPA label that will alert consumers that the device is designed and tested for use like the consumer will use it. This shift is possibly as important than just lowering emission standards for wood stoves. Along these lines, the EPA is also allowing stoves that already meet the 2020 standards, to use a special label so consumers can more easily recognize these higher performing stoves. We are, however, very disappointed that the EPA removed the long-standing requirement that all stoves have a consumer hang-tag that helps consumers better appreciate the basic differences between all stoves on the showroom floor.

Boiler testing: Another positive step forward is EPA’s recognition of the European test method EN303-5 to certify European style indoor pellet boilers that have been accepted by Renewable Heat New York (RHNY). Also boilers certified by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) will be automatically deemed EPA certified. This is another step to recognizing higher performance equipment. NYSERDA deserves credit for the R&D, test method and other funding that EPA and DOE should have been doing to develop higher performance equipment. These parts of the new EPA rule will help give consumers more options to buy cleaner and more efficient devices.

Stove emission standards: As expected, the EPA is staying with the de facto status quo for the next 5 years, at 4.5 grams an hour (g/hr). The 2 g/hr standard for stoves as of 2020 is fair and reasonable. As the EPA explained in the rule “nearly 90 percent of current catalytic/hybrid stoves and over 18 percent of current non-catalytic stoves” already meet the Step 2 emission limit of 2 g/hr. We hope that those manufacturers who have to redesign stoves use the opportunity to redesign to use cordwood and to reduce start-up and fugitive emissions. The optional Step 2 certification test for cordwood at 2.5 g/hr represents a very creative and positive approach by the EPA to move towards required cord wood testing.

Some independent stove and boiler companies played a vital role in broadening the debate and sharing key data sets that enabled the EPA to show that some stoves can already meet the Step 2 standards of 2 g/hr with cordwood. We are pleased that companies who participated in the 2013 Wood Stove Design Challenge helped the EPA and OMB understand that smallest manufacturers can undertake the R&D to make very clean and affordable stoves that operate well on cordwood.

Key issues not addressed: Some of the most important issues with wood stoves are difficult to address in regulations, such as indoor air quality from fugitive smoke and the ability for homeowners to reduce air-flow so much that the stove smolders for hours on end, which is often a nightly occurrence. Ultimately, we believe that some types of automation are needed to prevent the widespread consumer misuse of wood stoves. The attempt by the EPA to set a maximum emission level while the stove is on its lowest burn rate was a good start. We had urged the EPA to more formally address alternative tests for automated stoves that hold tremendous promise to reduce widespread poor operation by consumers.

Warm air furnaces: Delaying the standards for all warm air furnaces for 1 – 2 years was a mistake because some companies have little ability or intention of meeting the Step 1 standards. An interim measure after 6 months to distinguish between companies on their way towards meeting standards and those who aren’t would have been far better.

Exempt wood stoves:
We are very pleased to see that the era of exempt wood stoves is over. About 1 out of every 3 or 4 new wood stoves sold in America has been exempt in recent years and EPA had considered a weaker standard for them, but is now holding them to same standard as all other stoves.

Masonry heaters:
The EPA was not able to set standards for masonry heaters but we are glad to see that the EPA has charted a path forward to work with the Masonry Heater Association so that masonry heaters become a certified appliance category

Sell-through period: The sell-through period, set at 8 months through December 31st is fair for certified wood stoves, pellet stoves and qualified or EN303-5 approved boilers, but too long for exempt wood stoves and traditional outdoor boilers which should have come off the market sooner.

Electronic reporting: We were very glad to see that the EPA will begin electronic reporting for stove certification tests and provide more transparency for the public and access more data that is not Confidential Business Information (CBI) about stove tests.

Efficiency: Achievable efficiency standards are important in the near future and we are pleased that the EPA will finally require the manufacturers to test for, and report actual efficiency numbers not only to the EPA, but also on their websites. In practice however, many existing stoves many not have to retest for 3-5 years and it is unclear if they will have to disclose efficiency before then, unless they do it voluntarily. This is particularly important for boilers and pellet stoves that have a very wide range of efficiencies.

Renewable energy: We are very disappointed that the EPA did not mention the term “renewable” in this rule. The EPA Office of Air and Radiation should take into consideration that this sector has potential not just to make cleaner energy, but to use a renewable energy source and displace fossil fuels. Governor Cuomo’s Renewable Heat New York is investing tens of millions into the sector and integrates the goal of driving down emissions, driving up efficiency while replacing fossil fuels and offering homeowners an affordable, renewable heating source. In addition to setting minimum emission standards for lab testing, the EPA should adopt a more integrated approach to this technology that is being increasingly adopted not just by New York, but by other states as well.

In conclusion, the EPA crafted a fair and balanced rule overall and took some important steps towards testing with cordwood and recognizing those companies who take steps to build stoves based on how consumers operates them. In the long run, this new rule will result in cleaner appliances and a better foundation for renewable wood and pellet heating.

Full EPA rule and fact sheets

Wood and pellet stoves

Step New PM emissions limit Compliance deadlines
Step 1: All uncertified wood and pellet stoves (cat and non-cat) 4.5 grams per hour for crib wood test method

If tested with cordwood, emissions test method must be approved, and stoves must meet crib wood limit

60 days after publication in the Federal Register
Step 2: All wood and pellet stoves (cat and non-cat) 2.0 grams per hour, or 2.5 grams per hour if tested with cordwood (test method must be approved) 5 years after publication in the Federal Register (2020)

Hydronic heaters

Step New PM emissions limit Compliance deadlines
Step 1 0.32 pounds per million Btu heat output (weighted average), with a cap of 18 grams per hour for individual test runs (crib wood test method)

If tested with cordwood, emissions test method must be approved, and stoves must meet crib wood limit

60 days after publication in the Federal Register
Step 2 0.10 pounds per million Btu heat output for each burn rate, or 0.15 pounds per million Btu heat output for each burn rate. If tested with cordwood; method must be approved 5 years after publication in the Federal Register (2020)

Warm air furnaces

Step Standard Compliance deadlines
Step 1 Operational/work practice standards 60 days after publication in the Federal Register
Step 2 Emissions limit of 0.93 pounds of PM per million Btu heat output, weighted average. Cordwood testing is required for forced air furnaces Small furnaces: 1 year after publication in the Federal Register (2016)

Large furnaces: 2 years after publication (2017)

Step 3 Emissions limit of 0.15 pounds of PM per million Btu heat output for each individual burn rate. Cordwood testing required All furnaces: 5 years after publication in the Federal Register (2020)

Related stories:
Private Talks Yield Consensus on Key Issues in NSPS
Paper Undermines Stove Industry Variability Study

Heated Up!

New EPA Stove Rules Begin Cleaner Chapter for Wooden Heating

Statement by the Alliance for Green Heat on the Wood Heater NSPS

Key EPA architects of this NSPS include
Greg Green, left, and Gil Wood,  right  and
Amanda Simcox. Gil retired on February 3. 
Overall, the EPA did a good job and released a fair rule that includes many compromises between industry and air quality agencies.  We think these rules are good for consumers and will not drive prices up substantially for most product categories, but will result in cleaner and more efficient appliances that will ultimately save consumers time and money. This is our initial reaction to the rule, which we will be followed by a more thorough analysis.

High performance stoves: The EPA took some key steps to address the lack of recognition for high performing appliances. Notably, stoves that test with cordwood in the next 5 years can use a special EPA label that will alert consumers that the device is designed and tested for use like the consumer will use it. This shift is possibly as important than just lowering emission standards for wood stoves. Along these lines, the EPA is also allowing stoves that already meet the 2020 standards, to use a special label so consumers can more easily recognize these higher performing stoves. We are, however, very disappointed that the EPA removed the long-standing requirement that all stoves have a consumer hang-tag that helps consumers better appreciate the basic differences between all stoves on the showroom floor.

Boiler testing: Another positive step forward is EPA’s recognition of the European test method EN303-5 to certify European style indoor wood and pellet boilers that have been accepted by Renewable Heat New York (RHNY). Also boilers certified by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) will be automatically deemed EPA certified. This is another step to recognizing higher performance equipment. NYSERDA deserves credit for the R&D, test method and other funding that EPA and DOE should have been doing to develop higher performance equipment. These parts of the new EPA rule will help give consumers more options to buy cleaner and more efficient devices.

Stove emission standards: As expected, the EPA is staying with the de facto status quo for the next 5 years, at 4.5 grams an hour (g/hr). The 2 g/hr standard for stoves as of 2020 is fair and reasonable. As the EPA explained in the rule “nearly 90 percent of current catalytic/hybrid stoves and over 18 percent of current non-catalytic stoves” already meet the Step 2 emission limit of 2 g/hr. We hope that those manufacturers who have to redesign stoves use the opportunity to redesign to use cordwood and to reduce start-up and fugitive emissions. The optional Step 2 certification test for cordwood at 2.5 g/hr represents a very creative and positive approach by the EPA to move towards required cord wood testing.

Some independent stove and boiler companies played a vital role in broadening the debate and sharing key data sets that enabled the EPA to show that some stoves can already meet the Step 2 standards of 2 g/hr with cordwood. We are pleased that companies who participated in the 2013 Wood Stove Design Challenge helped the EPA and OMB understand that smallest manufacturers can undertake the R&D to make very clean and affordable stoves that operate well on cordwood.

Key issues not addressed: Some of the most important issues with wood stoves are difficult to address in regulations, such as indoor air quality from fugitive smoke and the ability for homeowners to reduce air-flow so much that the stove smolders for hours on end, which is often a nightly occurrence. Ultimately, we believe that some types of automation are needed to prevent the widespread consumer misuse of wood stoves. The attempt by the EPA to set a maximum emission level while the stove is on its lowest burn rate was a good start. We had urged the EPA to more formally address alternative tests for automated stoves that hold tremendous promise to reduce widespread poor operation by consumers.

Warm air furnaces: Delaying the standards for all warm air furnaces for 1 – 2 years was a mistake because some companies have little ability or intention of meeting the Step 1 standards. An interim measure after 6 months to distinguish between companies on their way towards meeting standards and those who aren’t would have been far better.

Exempt wood stoves:
We are very pleased to see that the era of exempt wood stoves is over. About 1 out of every 3 or 4 new wood stoves sold in America has been exempt in recent years and EPA had considered a weaker standard for them, but is now holding them to same standard as all other stoves.

Masonry heaters:
The EPA was not able to set standards for masonry heaters but we are glad to see that the EPA has charted a path forward to work with the Masonry Heater Association so that masonry heaters become a certified appliance category

Sell-through period: The sell-through period, set at 8 months through December 31st is fair for certified wood stoves, pellet stoves and qualified or EN303-5 approved boilers, but too long for exempt wood stoves and traditional outdoor boilers which should have come off the market sooner.

Electronic reporting: We were very glad to see that the EPA will begin electronic reporting for stove certification tests and provide more transparency for the public and access more data that is not Confidential Business Information (CBI) about stove tests.

Efficiency: Achievable efficiency standards are important in the near future and we are pleased that the EPA will finally require the manufacturers to test for, and report actual efficiency numbers not only to the EPA, but also on their websites. In practice however, many existing stoves many not have to retest for 3-5 years and it is unclear if they will have to disclose efficiency before then, unless they do it voluntarily. This is particularly important for boilers and pellet stoves that have a very wide range of efficiencies.

Renewable energy: We are very disappointed that the EPA did not mention the term “renewable” in this rule. The EPA Office of Air and Radiation should take into consideration that this sector has potential not just to make cleaner energy, but to use a renewable energy source and displace fossil fuels. Governor Cuomo’s Renewable Heat New York is investing tens of millions into the sector and integrates the goal of driving down emissions, driving up efficiency while replacing fossil fuels and offering homeowners an affordable, renewable heating source. In addition to setting minimum emission standards for lab testing, the EPA should adopt a more integrated approach to this technology that is being increasingly adopted not just by New York, but by other states as well.

In conclusion, the EPA crafted a fair and balanced rule overall and took some important steps towards testing with cordwood and recognizing those companies who take steps to build stoves based on how consumers operates them. In the long run, this new rule will result in cleaner appliances and a better foundation for renewable wood and pellet heating.

Full EPA rule and fact sheets

Wood and pellet stoves

Step New PM emissions limit Compliance deadlines
Step 1: All uncertified wood and pellet stoves (cat and non-cat) 4.5 grams per hour for crib wood test method

If tested with cordwood, emissions test method must be approved, and stoves must meet crib wood limit

60 days after publication in the Federal Register
Step 2: All wood and pellet stoves (cat and non-cat) 2.0 grams per hour, or 2.5 grams per hour if tested with cordwood (test method must be approved) 5 years after publication in the Federal Register (2020)

Hydronic heaters

Step New PM emissions limit Compliance deadlines
Step 1 0.32 pounds per million Btu heat output (weighted average), with a cap of 18 grams per hour for individual test runs (crib wood test method)

If tested with cordwood, emissions test method must be approved, and stoves must meet crib wood limit

60 days after publication in the Federal Register
Step 2 0.10 pounds per million Btu heat output for each burn rate, or 0.15 pounds per million Btu heat output for each burn rate. If tested with cordwood; method must be approved 5 years after publication in the Federal Register (2020)

Warm air furnaces

Step Standard Compliance deadlines
Step 1 Operational/work practice standards 60 days after publication in the Federal Register
Step 2 Emissions limit of 0.93 pounds of PM per million Btu heat output, weighted average. Cordwood testing is required for forced air furnaces Small furnaces: 1 year after publication in the Federal Register (2016)

Large furnaces: 2 years after publication (2017)

Step 3 Emissions limit of 0.15 pounds of PM per million Btu heat output for each individual burn rate. Cordwood testing required All furnaces: 5 years after publication in the Federal Register (2020)

Related stories:
Private Talks Yield Consensus on Key Issues in NSPS
Paper Undermines Stove Industry Variability Study

Heated Up!

Explain to the EPA we want cleaner and a lot more effective stoves

The EPA has proposed new rules that will need all household heating appliances to be cleaner. &nbspWe feel the EPA is on the correct monitor and we need to have to help their initiatives in the confront of a robust significantly appropriate-wing marketing campaign towards it. &nbsp

The future of wooden and pellet heating in America relies upon on the technologies turning out to be cleaner and a lot more successful. &nbspOtherwise, there will be much more and much more endeavours to restrict wood heating and to hold it out of renewable power incentive plans.
Indication the petition below, and share it with your buddies!
The Alliance for Green Heat teamed up with a stove manufacturer to start this petition in support of new restrictions for wood heaters. While there are numerous difficulties with the proposed rule, we know that EPA is working diligently and producing a lot of changes and open up to producing several more. The petition does not endorse the strictest feasible normal of 1.three grams an hour for stoves, but we think that a strict standard is essential and achievable. If you support the spirit and goals of cleaner and a lot more productive wooden and pellet heating, you should signal, share and ahead to your friends!
One purpose it is so critical for the EPA to hear from you is that there is a considerably correct-wing marketing campaign to undermine and end these restrictions.&nbsp Numerous far appropriate wing pundits, writers and bloggers are spreading the rumor that the regulations will ban wooden stoves, the EPA is attempting to get rid of the wood stove market and that rural The us will be the huge losers.&nbsp We know that these laws will be excellent for shoppers and great for rural America because they will outcome in a lot more efficient stoves and boilers which will preserve buyers hundreds of dollars every winter on gas.&nbsp And the diminished amounts of smoke are specifically essential for kids, seniors and anybody who has bronchial asthma.
Wooden and pellet heating ought to be a key element of our renewable strength future, and not sidelined because it is perceived as dirty and outdated-fashioned.&nbsp These restrictions will assist shield and encourage the capacity of Americans to affordably warmth their residences with wooden.

Thank you for your assist!

Heated Up!

Experts Gather in Seattle to Design Cleaner Wood Stoves

By John Ackerly
President, Alliance for Green Heat
In January I attended an amazing conference where about 60 people came together to share ideas on building cleaner, more efficient stoves.  But the conference wasn’t just about stove design; it was also about how to incentivize them, how to monitor their use, and how to deploy the clean ones more widely. 
 

Conference organizers

Speakers gave several presentations showing diagrams of optimal use of primary and secondary air.  Most of the discussion was about the two streams of secondary air and exactly where and when to get them into combustion chamber.  On one model, tests showed that it was critical to get the secondary air lower in the combustion chamber when the stove was operating on low so a separate channel carried it another inch down the stove wall.  And, it was found that if this air was not preheated, the stove operated just as well – often better – than if it was preheated.  One reason is that the air created more turbulence if it sank, rather than rising quickly along with the combustion gases.
Another major topic discussed was how to get people to give up their old polluting stoves and invest in new, efficient ones.  Some research showed that even when families understood how much wood they would save with a new stove, they were still very resistant to giving up their old one.  And, if they did buy a new one, the old one was not always discarded, but used in another place. 
One of the most fascinating subjects concerned the use of wireless sensors that could remotely monitor the temperature of the stove so researchers could learn more about the operating habits of the owner.  PM sensors could also show how the operating habits of owners impacted indoor air quality and measure the improvement compared to the old, more polluting stove.
Outside the classroom, we lit the stoves to see how fast they would be free of visible smoke.  The following day we tested the stoves with a dilution tunnel, not for any certification, but just to learn how testing was done, and to see how design changes impacted efficiency, CO, and PM emissions.  Engineers freely shared their innovations with others, and with the government officials from the EPA and European agencies, who also attended.
What distinguished this wood stove gathering from others I was familiar with is that the engineers and experts were all sharing their work and designs without first patenting their ideas.  It wasn’t about selling anything, but about a community working together, including to help existing and potential manufacturers build cleaner stoves. 
Unfortunately for some of us, the conference was about international cook stoves, not domestic heat stoves.  It made me painfully aware of how vibrant that community is in terms of sharing ideas and designs, and attracting so many different universities and small entrepreneurs.  It was organized by a non-profit called ETHOS: “Engineers in Technical and Humanitarian Opportunities of Service”.  The organization’s mandate is to facilitate research and development of appropriate technology by forming collaborative partnerships between universities, research laboratories, engineers, non-governmental organizations and the private sector.
As I sat in the sessions, which were fascinating, I kept wondering why such a collaborative and urgent campaign had developed around international cook stoves and not domestic heating stoves.  Part of the reason must be that the leadership and culture in humanitarian groups, which are publicly funded, compared to the private sector where companies are vying for market share.  Several of the groups and companies had DOE funding for R & D.
One of main leaders of that group is Dean Still, Executive Director of the Oregon based Aprovecho Research Center, a world leader in open source stove technology development.  Dean is a charismatic figure with seemingly boundless energy, the kind of person whom people rally around.  He oversees a biomass stove research laboratory that conducts emission equipment manufacturing, and is the author or co-author of six books and dozens of technical reports and articles on clean stoves.
 

Dean Still with Prince Charles

There has been some collaboration between Aprovecho and the domestic heat stove community over the years.  Dr. Larry Winiarski, a long-time Aprovecho figure, invented the rocket stove (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocket_stove) and Aprovecho has worked on numerous rocket mass heating stove projects in China, Tibet, Nepal, the Andes, etc.  Omni Test labs, an EPA accredited wood stove test lab, helped Aprovecho set up their dilution tunnel and emission testing system for cook stoves. 
After the conference, which was in Seattle, I drove down to Portland to visit Omni and Dirigo Test labs and discuss how the new EPA wood stove regulations would impact test labs.  Then I kept driving south to Cottage Grove, Oregon where Aprovecho is based.  I spent a few days with Dean Still and his dedicated team of engineers and test lab technicians (14 staff in all).  Every summer they run a “stove camp,” which I had read about in the feature story, “Hearth Surgery,” in the New Yorker Magazine.
Stove camp is a hands-on workshop where participants try to tweak stove designs and test them to see if they can improve efficiency and emissions.  Dean and I got to talking about doing a Heat Stove Camp this summer, where up to 50 participants would bring innovative wood stoves to tweak and test.  Normally at stove camp, applicants are selected based on their background and pay a minimal fee.  Each morning, everyone reviews the test results, which are data logged from the previous day’s tests, and discusses what design elements work best.  In the afternoon, participants can alter designs in the fully equipped metal shop, and then test them again. 

Dean and others think that their extended community can come up with designs that meet the 1.3 gram per hour mark without using a catalyst.  They have extensive experience using combustion fans in stoves, which some think is one of the keys to ultra low emissions.  One model that Aprovecho uses is to collectively design and test a stove, and then have a non-profit patent it so it can be open sourced, allowing anyone to build from it.  If this could be done for a stove that hits the 1.3 grams that the EPA is proposing all stoves meet in coming years, it would be a natural extension of the Wood Stove Decathlon, and help lift all boats.

Heated Up!

Outside boilers cleaner than wood stoves, boiler lobby tells Utah legislators

Legislators go to overturn outside boiler restrictions

In a heated combat over no matter whether out of doors boilers ought to be authorized in regions of Utah with inadequate air quality, the outside boiler lobby is swaying lawmakers with information showing that boilers are cleaner than wood stoves.

The lead Utah resident pushing for rules that would permit out of doors boilers, Daniel Leavitt, represented himself as a worried citizen to the Utah Air Top quality Board, and the Utah paper refers to him as a resident who operates his out of doors wooden boiler to heat his property. But what the paper failed to mention is that Leavitt is also a prominent Utah lawyer specializing in authorities relations and the brother of the previous Governor of Utah. What is actually more is that Leavitt is being paid out by Central Boiler, the boiler manufacturer foremost the marketing campaign.

In February, Utah adopted regulations that permitted the installation of Section 2 out of doors boilers in most of the condition but banned them in populated regions that do not meet federal air high quality attainment specifications. Central Boiler had fought against the laws but had been eventually unsuccessful.&nbsp

Following the restrictions were promulgated, the boiler company took its scenario to the legislature. On March 7, a around unanimous legislative committee sided with Central Boiler. They accredited HB394, which “prohibits the Air Quality Board from regulating the sale, set up, alternative, or procedure of an outside wood&nbsp boiler otherwise than other solid fuel burning
 units.” Om March 11, the bill was handed by the Utah Property and moved to the Senate.

Central Boiler submitted comments arguing that Period 2 out of doors boilers “are cleaner than EPA qualified wooden stoves.” David Leavitt, the “worried citizen” hired by Central Boiler, is also carrying that concept. “These outside wooden boilers are vastly a lot more productive than burning anything at all indoors,” he informed the Deseret News.&nbsp&nbsp

“Utah legislators ought to comprehend that even the best wood stoves and wood boilers are only as clean as the wooden that is loaded in them,” mentioned John Ackerly, President of the Alliance for Environmentally friendly Heat, a unbiased non-revenue marketing cleaner and much more successful wood heating.&nbspOutdoor wood boilers have fireboxes normally ranging from 14-sixty cubic ft even though a wood stove firebox is 2-three cubic toes.
“Outdoor boilers are often loaded with huge, unseasoned and unsplit logs and trash, in contrast to stoves.&nbspThis is a important reason that states control out of doors wood boilers and not stoves. Central Boiler adverts exhibiting efficiencies in the 90s are dependent on calculations that have been repudiated by the EPA,” Ackerly additional.

The Utah Section of Environmental Good quality (DEQ) explained the objections that that Central Boiler and Hearth, Patio and Barbecue Association (HPBA) experienced with the laws ended up “similar” and publicly responded to them. Privately, some people say the positions of Central Boiler and HPBA had crucial distinctions but the community document does not expose what they have been.&nbsp&nbsp

According to the Utah DEQ, the troubles raised by Central Boiler and HPBA included:
  • DEQ appears to spot increased excess weight to a variety of out-of-point out companies and other individuals who are generally skeptical towards the emissions reduction outcomes reached under the US EPA hydronic heater software.
  • DEQ has not offered scientific information or other rationale supporting what varieties of outside wooden boilers ended up authorized beneath the rule.
  • DAQ has not released any knowledge demonstrating that outdoor furnaces presently make impacts within the nonattainment and routine maintenance regions or that they will contribute to the exceedance of the NAAQS.
  • The 1000 ft. setback from schools is not necessary primarily based on modeling carried out by the State of New York.
In reaction to the initial proposed restrictions, Central Boiler argued that the “rule lacks scientific help and would unfairly prohibit Utah inhabitants from acquiring and employing thoroughly clean-burning wooden furnaces.” A principal thrust of Central Boilers argument is that Period 2 boilers “are cleaner than EPA certified wood stoves.” Exclusively they claim that “average emissions for a Stage 2 OHH are 77% considerably less than these from EPA-Qualified woodstoves.” The total submission by Central Boiler can be discovered&nbspright here.
“These outdoor wooden boilers are vastly more effective than burning everything indoors,” Levitt stated.

Heated Up!

In Race to Develop Cleaner Wood Stove, sixteenth and twenty first Hundreds of years Collide

&nbspAlliance for Inexperienced Warmth, January 16, 2013 – A wood stove design competition to be held on the National Mall in DC this November is pitting 16th century designs against microchip-controlled automation. And it is not distinct who will earn.

“The wood stove has turn into of icon of tradition,” stated John Ackerly, President of the Alliance for Eco-friendly Warmth. “But the concern is, can microprocessors deliver far cleaner and far more successful wooden warmth at a really reasonably priced price?”

For most People in america, thoroughly clean renewable energy conjures up pictures of solar panels and wind turbines – not wooden stoves and furnaces. But that could adjust. “This competitors could generate technology so persistently thoroughly clean that wood can become a prime tier renewable like photo voltaic,” Ackerly stated, whose group is web hosting the competitiveness.

Eight of the 32 entries are innovations on masonry heaters, a technologies created in the sixteenth century when wooden charges soared in Europe. These heaters are acknowledged for their capacity to successfully retailer and radiate heat for hours following the original fire goes out. Even so, they have a tendency to be costly and might get rid of points in the affordability category.

Five of the stoves are automatic, utilizing oxygen sensors and thermostats to control some or all of the combustion. Some make their possess electric power whilst other people need it to operate their automatic controls. Some can recharge cell telephones and be operated by wise telephones.

Three of the stoves are technically boilers which deliver h2o to warmth other rooms in the house, but appear like typical dwelling area wooden stoves. Seven of the stoves are downdraft designs, that means the flames are sucked down throughout the combustion process, which can result in incredibly low emissions. Other patterns don’t effortlessly fit into any solitary class simply because they include several progressive functions or are just really unique. 8 of the stoves are previously in shops, vying for recognition and market share.

With a number of exceptions, most teams come from North America and Europe, the place the race to deploy renewable power heating tools is creating momentum. Later on this thirty day period, nine judges symbolizing universities, institutions and authorities companies will slim down the 32 entries into 12-sixteen finalists that will be rigorously examined by qualified stove technicians until an all round winner is picked. Funding for the competitors comes from federal government agencies, foundations and sponsors.

“The historical past of wood heating is not usually a linear progression towards cleaner and much more productive styles,” stated Ackerly, who designed the competitiveness with university pal Jim Meigs, now Editor-in-Chief of Common Mechanics. “The pellet stove, invented in the U.S. in 1973, was a excellent leap in the heritage of cleaner wood heating. A related leap is necessary with twine wooden, and when the appropriate technological innovation meets the appropriate cost, we could see a renaissance in wood heating,” Ackerly said.

To understand far more about the Wooden Stove Style Challenge, go to: http://www.forgreenheat.org/stovedesign.html
Heated Up!

Finalists Introduced for Intercontinental Competition to Construct Cleaner Wood Stove

Pool of inventors, universities and companies will contend in first-ever Cleaner Wood Stove Design and style Challenge.

Earth Stove Wood StovesAlliance for Environmentally friendly Warmth, January 31, 2013 – Judges announced these days the 14 finalists for the Wood Stove Layout Challenge, the 1st worldwide competitors to develop an inexpensive, cleaner-burning wood stove for household heating. The finalists’ stoves will be analyzed and judged on the National Shopping mall in Washington, D.C.,in November 2013. The winner will acquire $ twenty five,000 income.

The Wood Stove Design Problem was introduced by the Alliance for Green Warmth, an impartial non-income, to bring far more innovation to a popular, commonly utilized renewable vitality gadget. In picking finalists, judges seemed for types that could create ultra-low emissions, large effectiveness, in addition to innovation, affordability, and marketability.

“The competition delivers with each other innovators – whether proven makers or backyard inventors – to increase America’s most common residential renewable strength unit, the wood stove. We have seen how technologies like oxygen sensors and catalysts have made today’s cars considerably significantly less polluting. We are thrilled to assist inspire a related technological revolution in wooden stoves,” explained Jim Meigs, choose and Editor-in-Chief of Well-known Mechanics.&nbsp

Amongst the fourteen types are stoves controlled by microprocessors and linked to smartphones, as nicely as extremely-successful stoves based mostly on seventeenth century Scandinavian types and several condition-of-the-artwork hybrid stoves that are previously on the market. Six are from Europe.

The nine judges satisfied last week at DOE’s Brookhaven Nationwide Laboratory and incorporate leading authorities from Well-known Mechanics, the New York Point out Strength and Analysis Development Authority (NYSERDA), the US Forest Support, Washington State Section of Ecology, DOE Brookhaven Countrywide Laboratory, The Biomass Thermal Strength Council, the Osprey Foundation, the Masonry Heater Affiliation and UC Berkeley.

The EPA calls for most new wooden stoves to be much cleaner than the unregulated stoves of the nineteen seventies and 80s, which have been notoriously polluting. Even so, the wood stove has not been embraced as a thoroughly clean strength technological innovation by most coverage makers or the public, in component because lower emissions are only achieved if consumers run the stove accurately. Numerous will not.

“We need stoves that incorporate ideal procedures in combustion engineering to maximize efficiency and dramatically minimize particulates and carbon monoxide. Then, wooden stoves will be ready to meet even more of our household heating demands,” said Mark Knaebe, a single of the judges and a Natural Useful resource Professional at the USDA Forest Service.

The 14 chosen groups are: Dragon Heat, The Firemaster, Helbro Stoves, Hwam, Intercontinental, Kimberly, Ofenbau &amp Feuerstein, SmartStove, Travis Industries, Tulikivi, University of Maryland, Walker Stoves, Wittus and Woodstock Soapstone.

Most of the groups represent set up wood stove firms, but five are independent inventors and engineering learners who have never brought a stove to market. Some are looking to sell their inventions to producers and other individuals are searching for recognition so they can ramp up creation.

The Grand Prize and next and third area winners will be picked during the Wood Stove Decathlon, held on the Washington Countrywide Mall and open up to the community in November 2013.

We thank our Design and style Problem sponsors for their assist:

Cleaner Wood Stove Competition

Heated Up!