Photograph Essay of the 2016 Pellet Stove Design Challenge

Patricia Fritz of the NY Office of Wellness and
Dr. Barbara Panessa-Warren, a nano particle skilled
from Brookhaven. &nbspTheir panel was a single of the most appreciated!
Dave Atkins, moderator of the wood stove retrofit panel,
introducing Jeff Hollowell, a retrofit builder.
Stove set up and set-up prior to the celebration. (Norbert Senf)
Marius Wöhler came from Germany to share ordeals of BeReal, a
European&nbspround&nbsprobin tests task&nbspand a multi-yr&nbspEuropean
&nbspUnion funded study of how people in fact use their stoves at home. (AGH)&nbsp
Geoffrey Johnson and the Torrefire Pellet Stove. (BNL)
SUNY Buffalo college students (from left: Kevan Darmawan, Kyle Hinman,
and Steven Widdis) making use of the Testo 320. (BNL)
The VibraStove, invented and
&nbspdesigned by Stephen Spevak.&nbsp
A drawing of what the PELLWOOD, first place winner, by Wittus,
could search like when it goes to marketplace. (Wittus)

Geoffrey Johnson, inventor of the Torrefire stove, with Jytte
&nbspIllerup, a Danish&nbspresearcher and Ricardo Caravahlo, a
Portugese&nbspPh.D. pupil from Denmark. (AGH)

Mark Knaebe, from the US Forest Support and John Crouch,&nbspfrom
HPBA&nbspat the automatic twine wood stove panel. Ben&nbspMyren
&nbspwas&nbsppresenting the VcV valve technologies via telephone. (AGH)&nbsp
The Alliance for Inexperienced Heat staff: Board members Dave Atkins,
Jonathan Kays, and Norbert Senf with AGH President John
Ackerly&nbspin blue and staff member Gabriella McConnel. (AGH)
René Bindig, a member of the initial
area&nbspteam,Wittus – Fire by Design and style.
Craig McKim of Testo, &nbspdiscussing
&nbsp tests methods with the SUNY Buffalo crew. (AGH)
Tom Butcher and Rebecca Trojanowski, biomass tests
&nbspexperts from Brookhaven Nationwide Laboratory. (AGH)
John Ackerly and Gabriella McConnel, of the Alliance for
&nbspGreen Warmth,&nbsppresenting&nbsptwo of the commercial
demonstration stoves. (Norbert Senf)

Invoice Clark of the Osprey Basis (proper) exhibits off the
Mimi Moto, an extremely thoroughly clean pellet fired cook dinner stove
that he distributes in Africa. (AGH)

Norbert Senf of the Masonry Heater
Affiliation presenting results on PM
&nbsprepeatability testing. (AGH)
Judges conference ahead of the Closing Ceremony. &nbspFrom the remaining:
&nbspRebecca Trojanowski, Mark Knaebe, Tom Butcher, Ray
Albrecht, Ellen Burkhard and Phil Hopke. (Norbert Senf)&nbsp
Stephen Spevak, inventor of the VibraStove, explaining
&nbsphis design and style to the learners of SUNY Buffalo. &nbsp(AGH)
Staff Wittus – Fireplace by Layout, seconds right after listening to
the information that they gained very first place. (AGH)
Rebecca Trojanowski, Craig McKim, Geoffrey Johnson,
and Mark&nbspKnaebe admiring&nbspthe testo design able of
measuring PM. (Norbert Senf)
Scott Williamson, Pelletstoveservice.com,
touching on&nbspthe greatest and worst of
&nbspinnovation&nbspin the pellet stove industry. (AGH)
Jock Gill, representing Jerry Whitfield,
talking about the heritage of pellet stoves
and the potential of biochar. (AGH)
Dr. Joseph Mollendorf, advisor to the SUNY Buffalo team,
&nbspspeaking on the automation and controls
&nbsphis students are doing work on. (Norbert Senf)
Adam Baumgart-Getz of EPA with Geoffrey
Johnson and the Torrefire stove,&nbspwhich
&nbspburns torrefied wood pellets. (AGH)
2nd and initial area teams congratulating every single other
(From still left: Vance Hirst Sr., Vance Hirst Jr., and
Vance Hirst III of Group Seraph&nbspand Niels Wittus and
&nbspRené Bindig of Crew Wittus – Fireplace by Style) (AGH)
Alliance for Environmentally friendly Heat personnel (correct) congratulating Niels Wittus and
&nbspRené Bindig, who received first area at the 2016 Pellet Stove Style Challenge.

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Rookie Wood Stove Makers Get Highest Score in Design Workshop


Taylor Myers and Ryan
Fisher with the Mulciber,
the highest ranking stove.
A stove designed and built by graduate engineering students received the 
highest score in an international Stove Design Workshop focused on automated wood stove technology.  The goal of the event was to assess innovative technologies that can help stoves reduce real-world emissions that result from poor operation by the consumer and use of unseasoned wood, both of which are widespread problems. 

Ten judges scored the stoves based on emissions, efficiency, innovation, market appeal and safety.  The highest scoring stove, the Mulciber, adapted emission control techniques that are in automobiles, such as an oxygen sensor that controls the fuel-to-air ratio, a continuously engaged catalyst and an exhaust gas fan.  The Mulciber was also tested with unseasoned, 50% moisture content wood and performed quite well.   The team, who had never built a stove before the 2013 Wood Stove Decathlon, overhauled their first prototype and have now formed the company MF Fire to bring the stove to market.  

The Workshop was held at the DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York and brought together a diverse range of stakeholders – students, professors, industry, regulators, air quality experts – who spent a week together analyzing the problems and solutions to residential cord wood emissions.

Five stoves competed in the event, which is part of the ongoing Wood Stove Design Challenge run by the non-profit group, Alliance for Green Heat. In 2013, the Design Challenge hosted the Wood Stove Decathlon on the National Mall in Washington DC, a high profile event modeled after the Solar Decathlon.  This year, the event was at a lab so that stoves could be tested more rigorously and test data could be shared with the participants.

The core problem is that most consumers do not operate wood stoves well and many use unseasoned wood.  In addition, EPA certification testing for wood stoves do not simulate how wood is burned in people’s homes.  For decades, manufacturers have been building stoves to pass that test, but not necessarily to burn cleanly in homes.  This workshop addressed that by testing with cordwood that was not fully seasoned, capturing some start-up emissions in the test and assessing how automation can reduce operator error.  At Brookhaven, stoves were tested at four parts of their burn cycle: warm start, steady state 1, hot reload and steady state 2. The current EPA stove certification test uses seasoned 2x4s and 4x4s and only tests for emissions after the start-up period, once the stove is hot.

Automated stoves, where computers, not consumers, adjust the air-to-fuel ratio, cannot be tested by EPA test methods so they are not able to enter the US marketplace.   A major goal of the Workshop was to start designing an alternative test method to the EPA’s method, so that automated stoves can be tested and become certified in the US, as they already are in Europe. Tom Butcher, a senior scientist at Brookhaven Lab, hosted one of the public webinars during the week on that topic.

Rankings: The judges gave double weight to emissions and efficiency, as they did in the 2013 Wood Stove Decathlon, because of the importance of those values.  This year, the judges decided not to judge affordability since most of the stoves were prototypes or technologies designed to be integrated into other stoves and ultimate costs and pricing was too speculative. Each of the 10 judges scored each stove on innovation and market appeal.  The other three criteria were based on lab tests.
“We want to congratulate the MF Fire team – and all the teams – for participating in a process of sharing innovation, ideas and test results,” said John Ackerly, coordinator of the event and President of the Alliance for Green Heat.  “These stoves have many of the solutions to excessive smoke from modern-day wood stoves and are challenging the EPA and the stove industry, to catch up with new technologies and new opportunities,” Ackerly said.

The Wittus team with the Twinfire.
While MF Fire stove, the Mulciber, had the highest combined score, several of the other stoves stood out in key areas.  The German Twinfire, designed by the Wittus team, had the second highest overall efficiency, at 74%, and one of the lowest emission rates on a test run.  Its automated air regulation enabled the stove to perform consistently well at different part of the burn cycle and it received the highest score for consumer appeal, for its downdraft flame into a lower chamber.  
The VcV, wired to monitor
temperature in key spots
The VcV, a New Zealand mechanical device that operates without any electricity, achieved the highest average efficiency, at 82% based in part on the lowest average stack temperature at 167 degrees (F), and the lowest emission rate on one of its tests.  It also received the second highest marks for innovation.  This was the only stove that did not require electricity and will be very affordable. Three out of four tests were very, very good, but on one the hot reloads, something happened and that reduced its overall numbers, and took it out of contention for first or second place.  This device has undergone extensive R&D and is one of the entries that is closest to being ready for the market.

The Catalus Ventus by ClearStak, received the highest score of all for CO reduction, and the second

The ClearStak team with the
Catalus Ventus

highest for emissions.   It was a highly innovative entry, employing dual cyclones, a pre-heated, continuously engaged catalyst and a fabric filter.  Its sensors and controller kept the oxygen rates incredibly steady, within half a percentage point. The technology could be integrated into a new stove, or added on to an existing stove. The designers did not try to optimize efficiency, which impacted their overall score.   

The Kleiss, ready for testing.
The Kleiss arrived at the competition with the hallmarks of an innovative, automated stove that could handle wet wood and nearly eliminate operator error.  The stoves sensors and algorithms were designed to maintain very hot combustion temperatures and to allow the operator to call for more of less heat, while prioritizing cleanliness.  However, the stove did not perform as expected, with secondary air contributing to primary burning with a large fuel load.   

Test results for all the stoves are available here.  (References to grams per hour are not comparable to EPA gram per hour tests since the Workshop used tougher test protocols.) A series of presentations by the stove designers about their stoves and other stove and combustion experts are also available.


The Wood Stove Design Challenge is a technology competition that also strives to bring key stakeholders together to assess and learn about new stove technology.  Primary funding came from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), the Osprey Foundation and the US Forest Service.  Testing support was provided by Myren Labs, Masonry Heaters Association and Testo and Wohler, two German companies who are pushing the envelope of accurate real time lab and field testing of particulate matter.  The Chimney Safety Institute of America and Olympia Chimney donated the chimney installations, and Blaze King and Woodstock Soapstone also provided support.

The 12 member Organizing Committee oversaw developing protocols, testing and scoring and included representatives from Alliance for Green Heat, Aprovecho Research Lab, Brookhaven National Lab, Clarkson University, Hearth.com, Masonry Heater Association, Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources, Myren Labs, NYSERDA, US Forest Service and Washington Department of Ecology. The Committee is now considering options for a 2015 Stove Design Challenge.


Heated Up!

Technology Design Challenge to Promote Top Performing Pellet Stoves

A yearlong project to test and assess pellet stoves is entering its first phase this summer.  This first phase focuses on the most popular pellet stoves in North America and aims to help consumers identify the most efficient stoves and how best to operate them.
The initiative is being led by the Alliance for Green Heat with a wide group of partner organizations and stove experts.  Pellet stoves are increasingly popular in North America and Europe, are far cleaner than wood stoves and have enormous potential to replace fossil heating fuel. 
2013 Design Challenge
in Wash. DC

The second phase of the project will feature an international stove technology competition to spotlight innovative and high performing pellet stoves and prototypes.  The project will culminate in an international gathering at Brookhaven National Lab in New York, where pellet stoves will be tested and the top performers will receive awards.  The focus will not just be on low emissions and high efficiency in a test lab setting, but also in the hands of consumers.  The application to submit pellet stoves and stove prototypes for the competition will be available later this summer.  The competition and workshop is scheduled for the week of April 4, 2016.

Ben Myren, Tom Butcher and others
in a lab at Brookhaven at the 2014
Wood Stove Design Challenge

This pellet stove challenge marks the third Stove Design Challenge, and the second to take place at Brookhaven. Previous challenges, including the inaugural Wood Stove Design Challengeon the National Mall in 2013, focused on promoting technological innovations that would help ensure wood stoves burn cleaner in the hands of consumers.  All the Stove Design Challenges involve stakeholder engagement in testing and assessing stoves, the opportunity to see and understand how testing works, and workshops and roundtables that bring together industry, regulators, air quality groups, non-profits and the media.

Phase one: Testing of Popular Pellet Stoves
There are approximately one million pellet stoves in North America.  Unlike the wood stove market, which has many manufacturers, most pellet stoves are made by just a handful of companies.  The Alliance will independently test some of the most popular models made in North America and Europe for emissions and efficiency.  The first round of tests will follow EPA lab testing protocols, while the second round will approximate how some consumers might use the stoves to better understand the range in efficiency when stoves are burned clean as well as dirty.  We will also test the stoves for noise level and ease of cleaning and repair. We may also test heat output and efficiency differences using high and low quality pellets.
Prior to both rounds of testing, the Alliance will explain what test methods and procedures are to be   used and seek input from industry and other stakeholders.  Testing will begin in an EPA accredited test lab and then move to Brookhaven National Lab.  The project expects to produce some data about the variability and reproducibility of emissions and efficiency in pellet stove testing. 

Planning meeting for the 2013 Design
Challenge. Pictured (left to right) Ray
Albrecht, Rod Tinnemore, Mark Knaebe,
John Ackerly, Melissa Bollman, David Agrell,
Ellen Burkhard & Tom Butcher

To get better baseline data on some popular stoves, the Alliance for Green Heat submitted a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to the EPA asking for emission and efficiency data for each of the four tested burn rates.  The Alliance also asked for moisture and ash content of the pellets used in the certification tests. 

Funding for the ongoing Wood Stove Design Challenge initiative has been provided by the New York State Energy and Research Development Authority (NYSERDA), Osprey Foundation, the US Forest Service and the Alliance for Green Heat.

More information about this yearlong project will be posted on our website, blog, Facebook page and monthly newsletter.

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Photograph Album of the 2014 Collaborative Stove Design and style Workshop

Ivana Sirovica, Jessica Peterson and Jeff Hallowell, from ClearStak&nbspBrookhaven Countrywide Laboratory.

Rebecca raking coal mattress to put together for the next load of gas.&nbsp
Thanks to John Pilger and Chimney Safety Institute of America and Olympia Chimney for donating pipe and installation!

Taylor Myers showing a actual time electronic show, using bluetooth, of temperatures in his stove.

Indigo Resort in Riverhead NY – our foundation for the 7 days

The Testo exhibits real time emissions, with prime line showing particulate issue (PM)

Rebecca Trojanowski removes filters. The dark circle in foreground are the particulates from the check burn that will be weighed to establish grams for each hour.

Even the kindling is very carefully weighed so that every stove gets the very same warm up rick.
Glenn Miller from the Fairbanks Air District on the remaining, Rob Rizzo from Mass. Dept. of Power, and Gaetan Piedalue and Marc Suave from Polytest Labs, a EPA accredited test lab. Ellen Burkhard from NYSERDA is peering into the stove.
Jessica Peterson from ClearStak functioning late into the evening to prepare for tests tomorrow.

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Collaborative Stove Design and style Workshop Announcement

The Collaborative Wooden Stove Design Workshop to be held Nov. 4 – 7, 2014 is a gathering of stove professionals to examine, take a look at, and talk about innovative wooden stove types.&nbsp The Workshop will be held at Brookhaven Countrywide Laboratory in New York and will entail fingers-on stove testing, every day review of examination data, and a series of shows by members and other specialists.&nbsp
Apps will be accepted beginning June 2 for advanced stoves to test at the event.&nbsp Stoves should have some type of automation that significantly minimizes operator mistake, use of unseasoned wooden, and/or commence-up emissions.&nbsp To use, stove designers must agree to share examination info received for the duration of the Workshop with other members and permit contributors to inspect their technology to find out how it operates.&nbsp
The Workshop is created for contributors to share their knowledge, learn from each and every other, and explore superior stove styles that might help substantially lessen particulate emissions and fulfill potential stringent emission specifications set by the EPA. &nbspThe Workshop will also be establishing an substitute take a look at approach for automatic stoves, as authorized under the present NSPS.
The four finalist stoves will be analyzed in a dilution tunnel employing the creating ASTM twine wooden check strategy. Screening will be carried out by Brookhaven workers, Ben Myren of Myren Consulting, and other folks. &nbspEvery single participant will vote on the successful stoves.&nbsp The first prize winner gets $ 1,000.
Participants:&nbsp Because of to space restrictions, there is only space for 30 participants.&nbsp We are searching for professionals from the stove sector, the global cookstove group, universities and government businesses as properly as inventors.&nbsp Fascinated persons may possibly implement as of June 2.
Stoves: &nbspStoves should consist of revolutionary, automatic attributes that pre-empt the operator from managing air consumption, or some other technological innovation that can considerably improve true entire world efficiency by lowering odds of misuse or extended smoldering.&nbsp&nbspMitigating the influence of employing unseasoned wooden is also crucial.
Logistics:&nbsp The Workshop will be held at the Brookhaven Nationwide Lab in Upton, New York, 1.5 hrs east of New York Metropolis on Prolonged Island. &nbspThere will be a $ 250 payment per participant to go over administrative and other expenses.&nbsp Lodging will be offered in a regional lodge and contributors must go over their very own travel, lodging and meals.
Qualifications: The Collaborative Stove Style Workshop is the 2nd phase of the Wood Stove Design and style Challenge, pursuing previous year’s Wooden Stove Decathlonon the National Shopping mall in DC.&nbsp As opposed to the Decathlon, this Workshop will not be formally judged or open to the general public. Relatively, it will be a more collaborative event with some of the country’s prime stove experts.&nbsp It is partially modeled after an once-a-year “Stove Camp” hosted by Aprovecho Investigation Middle in Oregon, which utilizes an interdisciplinary method to planning stoves that are frequently not patented, but open up-sourced so that any person can create them and boost on them.&nbsp The Workshop is getting sponsored by the Alliance for Green Heat and Brookhaven National Lab.
Arranging Committee (as of Might twenty):
1.&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp John Ackerly, Alliance for Environmentally friendly Warmth
2.&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp Ellen Burkhard, NYSERDA
three.&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp Tom Butcher, Brookhaven National Lab
4.&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp Ben Myren, Myren Consulting, Inc.
5.&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp Dean Nevertheless, Aprovecho Study Heart
six.&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp&nbsp Rebecca Trojanowski, Brookhaven Nationwide Lab
The stove and applicant application will be posted by June two on our website and website and a month-to-month summary in our publication. &nbspFor concerns or recommendations, remember to make contact with us at details@forgreenheat.org.

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Experts Gather in Seattle to Design Cleaner Wood Stoves

By John Ackerly
President, Alliance for Green Heat
In January I attended an amazing conference where about 60 people came together to share ideas on building cleaner, more efficient stoves.  But the conference wasn’t just about stove design; it was also about how to incentivize them, how to monitor their use, and how to deploy the clean ones more widely. 
 

Conference organizers

Speakers gave several presentations showing diagrams of optimal use of primary and secondary air.  Most of the discussion was about the two streams of secondary air and exactly where and when to get them into combustion chamber.  On one model, tests showed that it was critical to get the secondary air lower in the combustion chamber when the stove was operating on low so a separate channel carried it another inch down the stove wall.  And, it was found that if this air was not preheated, the stove operated just as well – often better – than if it was preheated.  One reason is that the air created more turbulence if it sank, rather than rising quickly along with the combustion gases.
Another major topic discussed was how to get people to give up their old polluting stoves and invest in new, efficient ones.  Some research showed that even when families understood how much wood they would save with a new stove, they were still very resistant to giving up their old one.  And, if they did buy a new one, the old one was not always discarded, but used in another place. 
One of the most fascinating subjects concerned the use of wireless sensors that could remotely monitor the temperature of the stove so researchers could learn more about the operating habits of the owner.  PM sensors could also show how the operating habits of owners impacted indoor air quality and measure the improvement compared to the old, more polluting stove.
Outside the classroom, we lit the stoves to see how fast they would be free of visible smoke.  The following day we tested the stoves with a dilution tunnel, not for any certification, but just to learn how testing was done, and to see how design changes impacted efficiency, CO, and PM emissions.  Engineers freely shared their innovations with others, and with the government officials from the EPA and European agencies, who also attended.
What distinguished this wood stove gathering from others I was familiar with is that the engineers and experts were all sharing their work and designs without first patenting their ideas.  It wasn’t about selling anything, but about a community working together, including to help existing and potential manufacturers build cleaner stoves. 
Unfortunately for some of us, the conference was about international cook stoves, not domestic heat stoves.  It made me painfully aware of how vibrant that community is in terms of sharing ideas and designs, and attracting so many different universities and small entrepreneurs.  It was organized by a non-profit called ETHOS: “Engineers in Technical and Humanitarian Opportunities of Service”.  The organization’s mandate is to facilitate research and development of appropriate technology by forming collaborative partnerships between universities, research laboratories, engineers, non-governmental organizations and the private sector.
As I sat in the sessions, which were fascinating, I kept wondering why such a collaborative and urgent campaign had developed around international cook stoves and not domestic heating stoves.  Part of the reason must be that the leadership and culture in humanitarian groups, which are publicly funded, compared to the private sector where companies are vying for market share.  Several of the groups and companies had DOE funding for R & D.
One of main leaders of that group is Dean Still, Executive Director of the Oregon based Aprovecho Research Center, a world leader in open source stove technology development.  Dean is a charismatic figure with seemingly boundless energy, the kind of person whom people rally around.  He oversees a biomass stove research laboratory that conducts emission equipment manufacturing, and is the author or co-author of six books and dozens of technical reports and articles on clean stoves.
 

Dean Still with Prince Charles

There has been some collaboration between Aprovecho and the domestic heat stove community over the years.  Dr. Larry Winiarski, a long-time Aprovecho figure, invented the rocket stove (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocket_stove) and Aprovecho has worked on numerous rocket mass heating stove projects in China, Tibet, Nepal, the Andes, etc.  Omni Test labs, an EPA accredited wood stove test lab, helped Aprovecho set up their dilution tunnel and emission testing system for cook stoves. 
After the conference, which was in Seattle, I drove down to Portland to visit Omni and Dirigo Test labs and discuss how the new EPA wood stove regulations would impact test labs.  Then I kept driving south to Cottage Grove, Oregon where Aprovecho is based.  I spent a few days with Dean Still and his dedicated team of engineers and test lab technicians (14 staff in all).  Every summer they run a “stove camp,” which I had read about in the feature story, “Hearth Surgery,” in the New Yorker Magazine.
Stove camp is a hands-on workshop where participants try to tweak stove designs and test them to see if they can improve efficiency and emissions.  Dean and I got to talking about doing a Heat Stove Camp this summer, where up to 50 participants would bring innovative wood stoves to tweak and test.  Normally at stove camp, applicants are selected based on their background and pay a minimal fee.  Each morning, everyone reviews the test results, which are data logged from the previous day’s tests, and discusses what design elements work best.  In the afternoon, participants can alter designs in the fully equipped metal shop, and then test them again. 

Dean and others think that their extended community can come up with designs that meet the 1.3 gram per hour mark without using a catalyst.  They have extensive experience using combustion fans in stoves, which some think is one of the keys to ultra low emissions.  One model that Aprovecho uses is to collectively design and test a stove, and then have a non-profit patent it so it can be open sourced, allowing anyone to build from it.  If this could be done for a stove that hits the 1.3 grams that the EPA is proposing all stoves meet in coming years, it would be a natural extension of the Wood Stove Decathlon, and help lift all boats.

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NYSERDA offers funding for Wooden Stove Design Challenge

The New York Point out Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) has awarded almost $ 50,000 to assist the technical facets of the Wood Stove Layout Challenge, contest officers have declared.
The function of the contest, which is run by the Alliance for Inexperienced Warmth, is to inspire engineers and companies to create a lot more successful wooden stoves, which can produce more heat with reduced emissions.
Funding from NYSERDA, which will go towards specialized assistance and operations expenses, will come from the Biomass Heating R&ampD Plan, which takes a thorough strategy to establishing a high efficiency and reduced emissions biomass heating market.

NYSERDA operates with companies, universities, engineering companies, study establishments, and federal and non-public labs to increase wooden combustion types and conduct third celebration evaluations. In addition, NYSERDA supports scientific studies to investigate the air quality and general public health impacts of wooden combustion.

A lot of the technical preparation for the Wood Stove Design Problem will take place at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, where NYSERDA funding will allow testing and calibration of the test tools and the fueling protocols. Dr. Thomas Butcher and his team will be screening transportable emission analyzers up coming to a dilution tunnel to figure out their applicability for on-web site tests at the Countrywide Mall in Washington D.C. in November.

Biomass heating has improved over the past ten years as the value of house heating oil has improved. But much of that boost comes from more mature, considerably less effective wooden burning systems that can trigger high wood smoke concentrations, particularly in rural valley communities.

The Wooden Stove Design and style Challenge is using cordwood to examination the stoves, so it’s consultant of how the stoves are used in homes. Typically, stoves have been tested with 2 x 4s in an attempt to maximize regularity and replication of the outcomes.

The grand prize winner will obtain a $ twenty five,000 cash prize. Among two and five prizes for next spot will share a $ 10,000 pot. Awards will be based mostly mostly on these kinds of characteristics as innovation, emissions, efficiency, affordability and most client friendly. Prize cash was raised through numerous personal sponsors.

The profitable stoves will obtain extensive publicity, and Popular Mechanics, who assisted layout the Obstacle, will protect the profitable patterns in its magazine and web site.

Heated Up!