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EPA takes step towards a “green label” for wood and pellet heaters

Posted by Earth Stove on November 16, 2015 with No Commentsas , , , , , , ,
The EPA issued its long-awaited voluntary hangtag, which will help consumers identify the cleanest burning wood and pellet heaters on the market. Only manufacturers who make stoves and boilers that already meet the stricter 2020 emissions standards can use the hangtag.
The hangtag is a major step towards a “green” or “eco-label” for wood and pellet stoves for designating those stoves that emitted the least amount of smoke in the test lab. The hangtag has a line to record efficiency, if the manufacturer chooses to disclose it, but disclosing efficiency is not required.  The Alliance expects some stoves with higher efficiencies to list their efficiency on the hangtag, and stoves with lower efficiency numbers to not disclose their efficiency. 
Most European countries have had eco-labels specific to stoves for many years that have helped drive the market to exceed the minimum emission and efficiency standards.  The EPA designed this hangtag “to provide an incentive to manufacturers to meet the federal 2020 standards early” but the main industry stove association, the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) is suing the EPA to prevent those stricter 2020 standards from taking effect.  It is still too early to tell if the big stove manufacturers may decline to use the hangtag because they may view it as a step toward the 2020 standards. Some smaller companies, that are not members of the HPBA, are already taking steps to display the hangtag. 
The current emission standard for wood and pellet stoves is 4.5 grams per hour and the more stringent 2020 standard will be 2.0 grams per hour.  There are 76 models of pellet stoves on the EPA’s list of certified stoves and 48 of them are already under the 2 grams per hour limit, so 63% of pellet stove models already meet these 2020 standards and are eligible to display the consumer hangtag.  Eleven stoves, or 14% of all pellet stoves are already less than 1 gram per hour.
More than 2-dozen non-catalytic stoves and more than 2-dozen catalytic stoves are eligible to use the hangtag.  (Unlike pellet stoves, the emissions from wood stoves are not designed to estimate emissions from in-home use and homeowners will typically emit far more smoke than labs can achieve during a certification test.)
Among EPA certified wood and pellet boilers, there are 72 models on the market and 38 of them meet the 2020 emissions standards and can use the hangtag.  Of those 38, only 5 of the models use cord wood achieve the 2020 standards but virtually all of the pellet units (33 out of 35) achieve the 2020 standards. Most of the certified pellet boilers are technologies imported from Europe and emit about one tenth of the emissions that certified cord wood boilers emit.
The development of the hangtag posed a number of concerns for the EPA, including whether they should list heat output in BTUs per hour, which is already included on the EPA’s list of certified stoves. The EPA decided to use a more general estimate of heat output, “Heating Area” in square feet,

estimated by the companies themselves, because BTU per hour claims have become too unreliable and prone to exaggeration.  In the past, the EPA did not require that test labs use actual efficiency numbers in heat output calculations, allowing test labs to use a range of efficiency estimates to make stoves look far more powerful that they actually are.

The hangtag also provides a box for companies to designate if they test with cordwood. So, for the first time ever, consumers can start to identify stoves that are designed and tested with the fuel that they would typically use themselves.  No stove has been certified with cordwood yet and the ASTM cordwood test method is still in progress, but several companies are expected to test with cordwood in coming months.
The EPA is using the back of the hangtag to list important educational messages.  Among those messages is the strongest endorsement yet of certified pellets, a move that will irritate many pellet manufacturers who have been resisting getting their pellets certified.  The EPA went so far as to claim that “non-certified pellets may be high in ash content, low and energy output, and have impurities that could harm your families health.”  While some cheaper pellets have high ash content, low heat output and possibly even contain impurities, the quality of many uncertified pellet brands are on par with those that are certified and some of the highest quality pellets are not certified.

The EPA’s willingness to strongly endorse pellet certification comes at a time when the main certifying body, the Pellet Fuel Institute (PFI), is also suing the EPA over some of the finer points of requirements that the EPA puts on pellet certification.

The success of the EPA’s consumer hangtag, like many eco labels, may hinge on branding and how recognizable the hangtag is to consumers.  If the EPA, states, and non-profits put resources into promoting the hangtag, consumers will be more likely to ask for it and base their purchasing decisions on it.  The first companies to start using the hangtag could see a boost in their sales and it could put pressure on the mainstream companies to use the hangtag, if they aren’t already.

“This hangtag will help consumers not only choose cleaner stoves, but also to choose companies committed to making cleaner stoves,” said John Ackerly, President of the Alliance for Green Heat.  “If the stove you buy today already meets the 2020 standards, the parts and service for that stove are more likely to be available 5-10 years from now, when you need it,” Ackerly added.

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Visit the EPA’s page on the voluntary hang-tag.  For more on problems with EPA listings on Btu output per hour, the lack of disclosure of stove efficiencies, the EPA’s 2020 emission standards for stoves and boilers and PFI pellet certification scheme.

Heated Up!

Masonry Heaters and the NSPS

Posted by Earth Stove on April 11, 2014 with No Commentsas , ,

By Norbert Senf,
Chair of Masonry Heater Affiliation Specialized Committee,
and member of the Board of Advisors of the Alliance for Inexperienced Heat
EPA has unveiled the prolonged awaited new model of their “New Resource Overall performance Standard”, which now contains masonry heaters in the segment “RRRR”.&nbsp In the very last version of this Standard, introduced in 1988, masonry heaters were exempted as “inherently clear burning”.

Norbert Senf lives in Quebec
and has developed masonry heaters
for far more than 30 years.

The Masonry Heater Affiliation (MHA) technological committee has worked very difficult to generate written remarks and recommendations to the Proposed Common (P.S.).
The draft NSPS proposes an emissions limit of .32 lb/MMBtu for particulates for masonry heaters. HPBA is opposed to a lb/MMBtu restrict, and is advocating for g/kg. In g/kg terms,&nbspthat would be about 1.eight g/kg, assuming 70% performance. HPBA cites the fact that lb/MMBtu requires an efficiency variety, and that there is no EPA recognized performance take a look at strategy for masonry heaters.

The MHA tech committee feels that lb/MMBtu will at some point be a greater way to evaluate heating appliances, since it requires effectiveness into account and avoids getting to make the distinction among g/kg for warmth storing appliances and g/hr for steady burn up stoves. To that end, MHA is conducting tests to see if the CSA B-415 efficiency strategy can be adapted to masonry heaters. However at this point we will assist the HPBA position.

Two tech committee customers are at the moment conducting tests on the Austrian Eco- firebox air layout, which was introduced at the MHA yearly conference in 2013. We are measuring repeatable particulate (PM) numbers substantially below 1 g/kg, around a fifty% reduction from current types. Much more information on the screening can be discovered here.

The fueling strategy proposed is ASTM E2817, which defaults to “manufacturer’s guidelines”, the method utilised in Europe. There are annexes for option crib and cordwood fueling techniques. In-home testing at MHA is displaying good repeatability with “manufacturer’s instructions” and cribs. Crib emissions seem to be approximately fifty% larger than “manufacturer’s instructions” with cordwood.
Maybe the greatest problems introduced by the functional aspects of the proposed requirements lie with the simple fact that EPA doesn’t comprehend the special running qualities of the masonry heater business. For lack of adequate funding in addressing this tiny portion of the wood burning business, regulators finished up copying significantly of the language from “AAA”, the wood stove part of the P.S.&nbsp
For example, the P.S. refers to masonry heater Licensed Model Traces, and involves aLicensing Restriction and a Storage Prerequisite.&nbsp The “model line” issue would need each and every heater built to be examined for emissions at an EPA qualified lab.&nbsp The “licensing” restriction helps prevent MHA from certifying a heater and promoting the ideas for it.&nbsp The storage necessity would demand a heater builder to hold a copy of every single distinct heater built in a sealed container.&nbsp MHA is protesting all of these concerns as unacceptable, given that masonry heaters are typically really weighty, website constructed 1-of appliances – similar to a masonry hearth, except with spectacular functionality enhancements. A lot of heater masons have fulfilled the considerable needs of the MHA Heater Mason Certification Program, and discussions need to have to consider spot with EPA on a lot more feasible regulation compliance mechanisms for masonry heaters.
On a a lot more hopeful note, as an substitute to certification screening, RRRR would permit a “validated personal computer product simulation program”. &nbsp&nbspA constrained edition of this is presently utilised in Europe. It could offer a excellent way to certify a “family of units” outlined as units with the same firebox proportions and also obtain acceptance of “substantially similar” heaters.&nbsp The complex committee has a undertaking beneath way to style and validate a calculator to fulfill compliance below this clause.&nbsp This could be a important way to keep on to supply customized designs to clientele.
&nbspAnyone developing fewer than fifteen masonry heaters for each year would be granted a five-year extension for compliance with the emissions restrict.&nbsp It is a delay of specifications that will be imposed for greater companies when NSPS becomes legislation, most likely in 2015.
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(The views expressed below do not always reflect the views of the Alliance for Green Heat. We have asked Norbert Senf and other individuals to support the Alliance in establishing our feedback to the EPA on masonry heaters.)

Heated Up!

Task Group begins work to consist of wood heaters in energy audits

Posted by Earth Stove on April 1, 2013 with No Commentsas , , , , , , , ,

Tens of thousands of energy audits take place every 12 months, but wood and pellet stoves are practically often still left out of them.&nbsp The Alliance for Environmentally friendly Warmth took this on, demanding vitality audit institutions to justify overlooking this kind of a vital piece of heating equipment. The leading institution in this space, […]