Tiny homes, tiny wood stoves: photos, ideas and designs

With the advent of the tiny home movement, there is a rise in interest in tiny stoves to heat them.  Tiny stoves have always been around, mainly driven by the sailboat industry, but also for yurts and small homes.  Small stoves are often thought of as stoves with a firebox of less than one cubic foot.  But some are much smaller than that and may put out no more than 10,000 BTUs.  There will also likely be a growing market for very small pellet stoves, like the Thelin Gnome, as living spaces get smaller and tighter. 
The paradox of heating a small space is that it may not be hard to heat up, but it also gets cold quickly after the stove goes out.  The fireboxes are so small that they go out quickly.  Often, tiny stove need to be reloaded every 20 – 60 minutes, depending on the size of the fuel and whether the stove is just getting going or has a decent coal bed.
A few of these stoves are EPA certified, including the Kimberly and the Gnome pellet stove.  If they are designed for boats, vans, trailers or for camping or other non-residential spaces, they should fall outside the EPA’s regulations, which only pertain to residential heating.  However, even if they do not require to pass EPA emissions testing to go on sale, they may not be allowed to be installed in a tiny home.  See our other photo essays on wood stoves styles around the world, wood fired hot tubs and firewood gathering around the world.

To minimize space, tiny stoves can be mounted on the wall. Using wood stoves in boats, vans and tiny homes can pose a great risk of carbon monoxide build up than in larger spaces. Be sure to install a CO detector, store your ashes outside and ensure the draft doesn’t reverse back down the chimney.
Tiny stoves are often installed on counters or shelves so that operating and cooking on them is easier.

Yurts are traditionally heated with larger, inefficient stoves, not small, sleek ones like this.  


The Gnome pellet stove is the smallest pellet stove on the market and claims to run for more than 24 hours on one hopper load of pellets at low heat.

The Viking 30 cookstove is part of a retro line of wood stoves from the UK.

A small stove in a classic Airstream trailer.

Heated Up!

Firewood Photos Inform Global Tale

Images of firewood from all around the world have numerous stories to notify.&nbsp From little sticks collected in Uganda to the huge tree trunks for out of doors boilers in America, it is a story of scarcity and loads.&nbsp It is also a story of mechanization, gender roles and even of survival itself.&nbsp As our earth faces a altering local climate from making use of way too a lot fossil gasoline, in some countries using much more firewood is a remedy, and in other international locations, making use of much less is critical. &nbsp

Virtually three out of 7.2 billion folks on our earth use wooden largely to cook their foodstuff on open up fires or conventional cook dinner stoves. &nbspBut options in the created world and the creating planet emphasis more on receiving cleaner and far more efficient appliances into use, not on striving to get family members to change from wooden to a fossil gasoline or another renewable. &nbspSustainability is not just about forest potential, but also the potential of neighborhood folks in any nation to undertake alternatives or use the source greater. &nbspUltimately, the story of firewood is also about public wellness, local weather alter, land use policy and cultural traditions.


Afghanistan

Bolivia

Sarejevo, Bosnia


Bulgaria

Canada

China


Estonia

Guinea

Indonesia

Israel

India (for funeral pyres)

Ivory Coastline

Japan (Tsunami particles)


Kenya


Lithuania


Poland

Poland (Jewish Ghetto, 1941)


Sahara desert


Somalia
Sri Lanka

Soviet Union, 1941

Switzerland

Tibet (drying yak dung fuel)


Uganda


United States


United States

United States

United States
Venezuala

Heated Up!